Here you may find out more about the abandoned village in Italy - Balestrino; its history and left attractions.
Balestrino, Italy
Balestrino, Italy
Balestrino is a village that emerges from a vast extension of olives and vineyards that border the entire habitat.

Located inside a landscape of olives, Balestrino was until the 11th century the possession of the Benedictine abbey of San Pietro dei Monti, thus reached in 12th century a branch of the Del Carrettlo that conserved it until the 18th century when the territory was annexed into the Kingdom of Sardinia (1735). The upper part of the town consists of a Castle (of Marquis) and the lower part a parish church (of Sant’Andrea). It is dangerous and not longer open to the public, but some of its important furnishings (two ancient altars in marble and a splendid pulpit adorned with the coat of arms of the Del Carretto of Baslestrino) are visible in the new church constructed in the modern style. Around 1860 about 800-850 people lived there. Those people were mainly farmers who took advantage of the landscape to farm olive trees.

In the late 19th century, the North-West coast of Italy was struck by numerous earthquakes. One of them destroyed some villages in the area of Savona, and although no official records show Balestrino was affected it coincides with much repair work and a dip in population. In 1953 the town was abandoned due to ‘geological instability’, and the remaining residents (approximately 400) were moved to safer ground to the west. The deserted part of Balestrino that has stood untouched and inaccessible for more than fifty years is currently undergoing planning for redevelopment. These days around 500 people remain in the town’s newer area which is about a kilometer down the road.